Quotes: The Soul’s Code

Hillman, J. (1997). The Soul’s Code: In Search of Character and Calling. New York, NY: Grand Central Publishing.

  • We are, this book show maintain, less damaged by the traumas of childhood done by the traumatic way we remember childhood as a time of unnecessary and externally caused calamities that wrongly shaped us. pg4

  • We told our lives by the way we conceive them. p5

  • Together they make up the “acorn theory,” which holds that each person bears a uniqueness that asks to be lived and that is already present before it can be lived. pg 6

  • You are born with the character; it is given; a gift, as the old stories say, from the guardians upon your birth. p. 7

  • The idea comes from Plato, his Myth of Er at the end of his most well – know work, the Republic. p. 7

  • For centuries we have searched for the right turn for this “call.” The Romans named it your genius; the Greeks, your daimon; and the Christians your guardian angel. p9

  • I want us to envision that with children go through has to do with finding a place in the world for their specific calling. p13

  • Rebellious intolerance, as the example of Yehudi Menuhin shows, is a primary characteristic of acorn behavior. p18

  • This “parental fallacy,” as we shall expand upon in the chapters of that name, is hard to avoid. The fantasy of parental influence on childhood follows a student life long after the parents themselves are faded and photographs, so that much of their power comes from the idea of their power. p20

  • According to the Adlerian theory, challenges of the list, birth defects, poverty, or other untoward circumstances and youth provide the stimulus for all higher achievements. Page 24

  • Extraordinary people are not the different categories; the workings of this engine in them are simply more transparent. p 29

  • I want psychology to have its base in the imagination of people rather than in their statistics and their diagnostics. I want to poetic mind applied to case histories so that we read them for what they are: modern forms affection, and not scientific reports. p33

  • Even if each image is indeed pregnant with meanings and subject to dissecting analysis, should we jump to the meetings without appreciating the image, we have lost a pleasure that cannot be recovered by the very best of interpretations. p 36

  • Until the culture recognizes the legitimacy of growing down, each person in the culture struggles blindly to make sense of the darkening and just bearings that the soul requires to deepen into life. p 43

  • The addiction to perfection is another term for the call of the angel. The voice that cautions speaks only part of the diamon’s message. p48

  • We are back to a general principle: The hearts image requires efforts of attachment to every sort of anchoring circumstance, whether these anchors either loyalty of friends, the stability of contracts, the reliability of health, the schedules of the clock, the facts of geography. p 53

  • But if there is an archetypal sense of loneliness accompanying us from the beginning, then to be alive is also to feel lonely. Loneliness comes and goes the part from the measures we take. p 56

  • Desperation grows worse when we seek ways out of despair. p 56

  • Loneliness presents the emotions of exile; the soul has not been able to fully grow down, and is wanting to return. To wear? We do not know, for that place the Mets and cosmologies say is gone from memory. But imaginative yearnings and the sadness a test to an exile from what the soul cannot express to except as loneliness.

  • Loneliness presents the emotions of exile; the soul has not been able to fully grow down, and is wanting to return. To where? We do not know, for that place the myths and cosmologies say is gone from memory. But imaginative yearnings and the sadness attest to an exile from what the soul cannot express except as loneliness. p57

  • The Platonic a growing down with which we began this chapter says the soul descends and four modes – via the body, the parents, place, and circumstances. These four ways can be instructions for completing the image you brought with you on arrival. p 62

  • For all for her Rohlich individualism America still clings to a mother – based developmental psychology that states we are fundamentally results of parenting and, as such, fundamentally victims of what happened in the past and left and DelachalFor all for her Rohlich individualism America still clings to a mother – based developmental psychology that states we are fundamentally results of parenting and, as such, fundamentally victims of what happened in the past and left indelible stains. p 77

  • The elevation of the parents, of the mother and particular, to the neglect of all other realities – societal, environmental, economic – shows that adulation of an archetype can obliterate common sense.p 78

  • Mother – based theories comfort and suffocate, though. p79

  • The man who has lost his angel becomes demonic; and the absence, the anger, and the paralysis on the couch are the symptoms of the soul in search of a lost call to something other and beyond. p 82

  • Like the vampires that so fascinating, children in our culture, sentimentalized for their innocence and neglected on account of the bother they cause, drained away the blood of adult life. p85

  • The more we cling to the overriding importance of parents and the more cosmological power we accord them, the less we notice the fathering and mothering afforded by the world every day and what it sends our way. Page 86

  • According to the observations of the brilliant pioneer of ecology Edith Cobb, the imagination of children depends Foley on this contact with the environment. Page 87

  • First I must make that psychological reconstruction, that leap of faith out of the house of the parents and into the home of the world. p 87

  • In other societies an ancestor could be a tree, a bear, the salmon, a member of the dead, a spirit in a dream, a special spooky place. Page 89

  • To be an ancestor you do not need to be dead, but you do need to know the dead – that is, the invisible world and how and where it touches the living. p 89

  • It passion to cage the invisible by visible methods continues to motivate the science of psychology, even though that science has given up the century – long search for the soul in various body parts and systems. p 92

  • Myth fall back on invisibility. They show an enticing face, but their backdrop disappears under scrutiny. Nothing is there. We are lost in the woods. Page 93

  • There are three traditional bridges: mathematics, music, and myths. Mysticism might be considered a fourth. However, mysticism unites visible and invisible; all things are transparent and proclaim their invisible ground. p94

  • So enchanted are we buy the mystery transposed into the systems that we mistake the system for the mystery; rather, they are indications pointing towards it. p 94