Quotes: Healing Fiction

Hillman, J. Chapter 2. “The Pandemonium of Images—Jung’s Contribution to Know Thyself.” In Healing Fiction, pp. 53-63 and 75-81. (17 pages).

  • In order to cope with the storms of emotion, he wrote down his fantasies and let the storms transpose themselves into images. p 53

  • Jung becomes that extraordinary pioneering advocate of the reality of the psyche. p 54

  • Know Thyself in Jung’s manner means to become familiar with, to open oneself to and listen to, that is, to know and discern, daimons. p 55

  • This radical activation of imagination was Jung’s method of Know Thyself. p 56

  • This psychic reality discovered by Jung consists in fictive figures. p.56

  • Our life in soul is a life in imagination. p 56

  • There are a multiplicity of answers to all major, archetypal, sorts of questions… p 57

  • To know thyself, to know the soul, one observes its association, the way it wills and it remembers, its manners of perceiving, sensing, tasting, feeling, and especially the way of its cogitation, its pure, imageless thinking modes. p 58

  • For psychic objectivity, or what Jung calls the objective psyche, we require first of all psychic objects, powers that relentlessly obstruct the ego’s path as obstacles, obsessions, obtrusions. And this is precisely how Jung speaks of the complexes as Gods or daimons that cross our subjective will. p 59

  • The land of the dead is the country of ancestors, and the images who walk in on us are our ancestors. In not literally the blood and genes from whom we descend, then they are the historical progenitors, or archetypes, of our particular spirit informing it with ancestral culture. p60

  • Jung attributes the moral moment to the responding ego, whereas I would psychologize the question further, asking why does the moral question arise at all in his mind after the encounter with images? p61

  • Our images are our keepers, as we are theirs. p61

  • When an image is realized–fully imagined as a living being other than myself–then it becomes a psychopomps, a guide with a soul having its own inherent limitations and necessity. p 62

  • There is thus revealed through this engagement a morality of the image. p 62

  • After Jung, Know Thyself means an archetypal knowing, a daemonic knowing. It means a familiarity with a host of psychic figures from geographical, historical and cultural contacts, a hundred channels beyond my personal identity. After Jung, I cannot pretend to know myself unless I know the archetypes–”the conception of the as daimonia is therefore quite in accord with nature,” says Jung. And I meet these peculiar creatures both as images in the imagination and as the archetypal patterns moving within my consciousness. p63

  • To the intellect, the daimons seem to appear as a pandemonium, and the intellect’s reaction is to attempt an intellectual diakrisis (discernment, differentiation). p76

  • Therefore, the more profound inquiry is that one which attempts to discover the relation between Gods and daimons–or archetypes and complexes to use Jung’s language. p.76

  • Why one undertakes active imagination…

    • not a spiritual discipline

    • not to be confused with art for exhibition

    • not at silence but at speech

    • not a mystical activity

    • not for the sake of curing symptoms

    • not a psychological activity p 79

  • Primarily, it aims at healing the psyche by reestablishing it in the metaxy from which it had fallen into the disease of literalism. p 80

  • Healing this means Return and psychic consciousness means Conversation, and a ‘healed consciousness’ lives fictionally. p 80

  • Each image is it’s own beginning, its own end, healed by and in itself. p80

  • There is no other end than the act of soul-making itself and soul is without end. p 81

  • The endlessness of Know Thyself opus is, in Jung’s language, a process of individuation. p81

  • With every increase of the spirit’s heat, there needs to be a corresponding increase of the soul’s capacity to contain it. to amplify with its inner sacral space. p 81

  • No longer polarity, but plurality. p81